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Our Scientists

Check out a few of the scientists involved in understanding the plate boundary and natural hazards here on the East Coast

These are some of the scientists, from a number of different science fields who are working to discover more about the plate boundary and how natural hazards affect us.

Lorna Strachan

“For me, the most exciting thing about doing science is working in a team of like-minded people and bouncing ideas and thoughts off one-another.”

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Rebecca Bell

“My job description is “find out something new that no one has ever found out before”- that is excellent motivation to go to work each day!”


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Rob Bell

“I had a unique opportunity to learn about the destructive power of tsunami, when I went to Thailand after the devastating Boxing Day tsunami in 2004"

 

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Susan Ellis

“Studying earth sciences lets me combine my passion for the outdoors with fun experiments to answer questions about natural hazards in New Zealand.”

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Philip Barnes

“I’ve always been interested in the natural landscape around me and how it came to be like it is, whether it be on land or under water”

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David Johnston

“New Zealand communities are vulnerable to a number of natural hazard events”

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Laura Wallace

 “Since learning about plate tectonics at school I haven’t been able to look at a world map without trying to fit the plates back together.” 

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Joshu Mountjoy

"I have always been interested in landscapes and when I started studying geology at university it soon became apparent that geomorphology was where it was at."

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Kate Clarke

 “I love discovering new things – for example, uncovering evidence for a past earthquake or tsunami that we would otherwise never know about”


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Nicola Litchfield

 “I's exciting to see if our results match others, or whether she’s come up with something entirely new that will change the big ideas”


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Ursula Cochran

“We hope our research will enable us to forecast the next 'megathrust' earthquake.”

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Miles Crawford

“I get to meet lots of different and interesting people while carrying out my research”

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Amandine Dhellemmes

 “One of the most exciting things about doing science is being surprised by what I learn, and finding something I didn’t expect.”


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